Subject Verb Agreement with Every

November 19, 2021

Subject-verb agreement is fundamental to good grammar and clear communication. It is important to ensure that the subject and verb of a sentence are in agreement to avoid any misunderstandings or confusion. One area where this can be particularly tricky is when using the word “every.” In this article, we will explore the rules of subject-verb agreement when using “every” as the subject of a sentence.

When “every” is used as the subject of a sentence, the verb that follows it should always agree with the subject. For example:

– Every student in the class is required to submit a report.

– Every day, the sun rises in the east.

In both of these examples, the verb “is” agrees with the singular subject “student” and “day.” However, things can become more complicated when the subject following “every” is a plural noun.

When the subject following “every” is a plural noun, the verb that follows it should be a plural verb. For example:

– Every Monday and Wednesday, the students attend their music class.

– Every book and pen on the table belongs to the teacher.

In both of these examples, the verb “attend” and “belongs” agree with the plural subjects “students” and “book and pen.”

It is important to note that when using “every” as the subject of a sentence, it is always followed by a singular noun or a plural noun. It is not used with an uncountable noun (e.g., “Every water in the bottle” is incorrect; instead, use “All the water in the bottle”).

Another thing to keep in mind when using “every” as the subject of a sentence is that it should not be confused with “each.” While they may seem similar, “each” is a determiner and can be used with both singular and plural nouns. For example:

– Each student in the class has their own desk.

– Each pen and pencil on the table is brand new.

In conclusion, subject-verb agreement is important in maintaining clear communication. When using “every” as the subject of a sentence, always ensure that the verb that follows agrees with the subject, whether it is singular or plural. Remember also that “every” is always followed by a singular noun or a plural noun, and it should not be confused with “each.” Following these rules will help you to avoid common mistakes and create clear and effective writing.